CI Market Dashboard

We have put together a collection of market indicators and track them to help you gauge the direction of the market.


CI Analysis Worksheets

Interactive analysis templates covering DuPont analysis (return on equity), valuing stocks the Warren Buffett way, and more to come.


CI Blog Feed

Dropbox Announces More Storage Space, Better Sharing Options for Pro Subscribers
posted 4 days ago by Wayne Thorp

Bullish Sentiment Hits Another 2014 High
posted 4 days ago by Wayne Thorp

No Changes to Market Dashboard
posted 7 days ago by Wayne Thorp

Intuit Releases Quicken 2015 for Mac
posted 10 days ago by Jaclyn McClellan

Supply Snag for Apple iPhone 6 Screen
posted 10 days ago by Wayne Thorp



Computerized Investing > May/June 2008

Editor's Outlook: Apple Pulls a Microsoft

PRINT | | | | Add your comment! | A A   Reset

by Wayne A. Thorp, CFA

Most Windows users have some piece of Apple software installed on their PCs. For me, it’s iTunes—so I can listen to my music while writing articles. Like many other software companies, Apple prompts the users of its software whenever they release an update or new version of a program with its Software Update utility. As an iTunes and QuickTime (Apple’s media player) user, I can expect the prompt window to appear every couple of weeks, urging me to install the latest versions.

A few months ago, Apple innocently or surreptitiously, depending on which side of the Apple versus Microsoft argument you are on, added an “update” option for its Safari Web browser. For many of us, present company sometimes included, seeing an “Ok” or “Install” button evokes a mouse-click stimulus/response reaction. Luckily, I noticed the word Safari, which prompted a closer look. I didn’t recall having Safari installed on my system, so I unchecked the Safari option and simply installed the iTunes update.

Well, as it turns out, the Safari “update” was actually a new installation, begging the question: “When is an update not really an update?” It appears that many other people were caught unaware, resulting in a fresh installation of Safari, whether they actually wanted it or not. And so a furor began.

...To continue reading this article you must be a Computerized Investing Subscriber.

Gain exclusive access to this article and all of the benefits and investment education a Computerized Investing subscription offers.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY for just $24.
Log in
Already a CI subscriber? Login to read the rest of this article.

Subscribe
A subscription to Computerized Investing includes a monthly email and access to the CI Website, all of which aim to benefit your investing skills with respect to computers and the Internet.

  


Discussion

No comments have been added yet. Add your thoughts to the discussion!

You need to log in as a registered AAII user before commenting.
Create an account

Log In