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John Deysher

author Image John Deysher is president and portfolio manager of the Pinnacle Value Fund, a diversified, SEC-registered mutual fund specializing in the securities of small and micro-cap firms. He is a CFA charterholder and has managed equity portfolios for over 30 years. He lives and works in New York City and may be reached at deysher@pinnaclevaluefund.com.


Articles by this Author

Areas of Expertise: small- and micro-cap value investing

Website: www.pinnaclevaluefund.com

Topics Presented in Speeches: “Small- and Micro-Cap Value Investing”

Email: deysher@pinnaclevaluefund.com

Biography:
John Deysher is president of Bertolet Capital LLC, advisor to the Pinnacle Value Fund, a diversified SEC-registered mutual fund specializing in the securities of small- and micro-cap firms. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation and has been managing equity portfolios for over 30 years. From 1990 until late 2002, he was a portfolio manager and senior analyst with Royce & Associates, an investment firm specializing in small company securities.

Deysher began his investment career at Kidder Peabody in 1983 where he managed equity and fixed-income portfolios for individuals and small institutions. He holds a bachelor's degree from the Pennsylvania State University and master's degrees in business (from Indiana University) and engineering (from the University of California Berkeley).

He lives and works in New York City and in his spare time enjoys sports, arts and entertainment, reading and public speaking. He is reachable at deysher@pinnaclevaluefund.com.

Articles by this Author


  1. Mutual Funds »

    Qualitative Guidelines for Mutual Fund Selection

    Looking at the type and frequency of communications, portfolio holdings, manager stability and expense ratio caps can help with the fund selection process.

    June 2014 | Journal

  2. Mutual Funds »

    The Mutual Fund Cash Dilemma

    While most mutual fund managers are required to stay invested, some have the flexibility to raise their cash allocations, raising an allocation dilemma for shareholders.

    May 2014 | Journal

  3. Bonds »

    Seeking Tax-Free Income From Closed-End Funds

    Closed-end municipal bond funds provide income that is exempt from federal taxes, but investors should be selective when choosing among them.

    June 2011 | Journal

  4. Portfolio Strategies »

    Preferred Stocks: An Overlooked Alternative

    Preferred stocks can augment income strategies with priority access to dividends, but expose investors to interest rate and credit risk.

    August 2010 | Journal

  5. Risky Business: How to Pick Winning Property & Casualty Insurer Stocks image

    The Best of the AAII Journal »

    Risky Business: How to Pick Winning Property & Casualty Insurer Stocks

    Many great fortunes have been built by smart insurance operators. A good example is Berkshire Hathaway, which has interests in several insurers and reinsurers covering a variety of property and casualty risks. At its heart, the P&C insurance business is one of shared risk--and proper pricing of that risk. How to spot opportunities in the risk business.

    August 2009 | Journal

  6. Money in the Bank: How to Find Opportunities in a Fallen Sector image

    Stock Strategies »

    Money in the Bank: How to Find Opportunities in a Fallen Sector

    In the past year or so, bank stock prices have fallen sharply. But declining stock prices yield opportunity. Many good banks have been tarred with the same brush as the troubled banks. How do you analyze a bank? A brief look.

    July 2008 | Journal

  7. Stocks »

    Money in the Bank: How to Find Opportunities in a Fallen Sector

    In the past year or so, bank stock prices have fallen sharply. But declining stock prices yield opportunity. Many good banks have been tarred with the same brush as the troubled banks. How do you analyze a bank? A brief look.

    July 2008 | Evergreen

  8. Stock Strategies »

    Cheaper by the Dozen: 12 Wall Street Classics for 2008

    Recommended reading for stock investors on a variety of investment topics.

    January 2008 | Journal

  9. Stock Strategies »

    Investing in BDCs: Private Equity for Public Shareholders

    Private equity is a term we're hearing a lot about these days, with many companies large and small going private. How can you get in on a piece of the action? A look at Business Development Companies.

    June 2007 | Journal

  10. Stock Strategies »

    The Hybrid Advantage: Why Preferreds Are Preferred

    The last few years have been tough for yield-oriented investors. But there is one income vehicle that can augment holdings in low-yielding common stocks. A closer look at the preferred stock advantage.

    May 2007 | Journal

  11. Features »

    Rodney Dangerfield Investing: Closed-End Opportunities

    Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are relative newcomers compared to closed-end funds, yet ETFs are mushrooming in popularity and press coverage. Like Rodney Dangerfield, closed-end funds still don't get the respect they deserve. But "no respect" can translate into opportunities.

    April 2007 | Journal

  12. Stock Strategies »

    Parting Company: 4 Rules for When to Sell

    Selling is one of the toughest parts of investing. Doing it well can make you multiples, but doing it poorly can cost you dearly. A look at four basic rules for how to know when to let go.

    September 2006 | Journal

  13. Stock Strategies »

    5 Memorable Mistakes and the Lessons I Learned

    Winning in the stock market is often about not losing, and one of the ways to avoid losses is to learn from your mistakes.

    July 2006 | Journal

  14. Stock Strategies »

    Your Brokerage Account: Protection Beyond SIPC

    If a brokerage firm goes belly-up, how protected are customer accounts from creditors and other parties? While brokerage busts have been rare in recent years, it's a question worth pondering. A look at where you stand in the event of a problem.

    April 2006 | Journal

  15. Stock Strategies »

    Going Dark: The Harsh Reality of Voluntary Deregistration

    A growing number of small companies are "going dark"--voluntarily deregistering with the SEC and delisting their shares. The result is often a falling share price and investors left in the dark about the firm's finances and prospects. What it all means, and what you should do if you are left in the dark with one of your holdings.

    January 2006 | Journal