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The Individual Investor's Guide to Exchange-Traded Funds 2010

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) continue to grow in popularity. There are now approximately 330 ETFs that each manage more than $200 million in assets. To put this number into perspective, five years ago, many of these funds didn’t even exist.

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It’s easy to understand why ETFs have grown so rapidly. Exchange-traded funds trade like stocks. This means they can be bought and sold throughout the day and their prices are constantly updated. ETFs are also popular because of their low expenses. Since they track an index, ETFs tend to be more tax efficient than most mutual funds and have lower expense ratios. Finally, information on their holdings is updated frequently, which provides greater transparency.

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Like any investment, exchange-traded funds are not without their risks. Similar-sounding funds can have very different compositions. The top holdings for some funds can account for a very large proportion of total holdings, lowering the diversification benefits. Volatile market conditions can cause large fluctuations in prices. Dividends, when paid, are taxable. Thus, it is important to read the prospectus and stay abreast of the how the fund is managed.

It is also important to remember that exchange-traded funds, like any investment vehicle, work best when held in a diversified portfolio. This is why we’re proud to say AAII’s 2010 Guide to Exchange-Traded Funds covers a record number of ETFs. You will find nearly 330 funds in the following pages and over 1,000 funds in an expanded spreadsheet on AAII.com.

Exchange-traded funds presented here are grouped by category and listed alphabetically within each category; the ticker symbol is indicated after each fund’s name. The listings provide information on a variety of return and risk data, portfolio composition and expenses.

Exchange-traded notes (ETNs) are also included. ETNs are similar to ETFs in that they trade on exchanges like stocks and are designed to mimic the performance of an index. ETNs, however, are debt securities. Thus, the credit quality of the issuer needs to be considered in addition to other factors (asset class, performance, expense ratios, etc.) when looking at an ETN. Broad references to ETFs in this guide will encompass ETNs, unless stated otherwise.

The category names for this year’s guide have been changed slightly from past ETF guides to more closely resemble the categories used in our annual Guide to the Top Mutual Funds (published in the February 2010 AAII Journal and also posted online). This decision was made because individual investors should choose the investment vehicles that best suit their needs, which may mean utilizing a combination of both ETFs and mutual funds.

How to Use This Guide

Exchange-traded funds have lowered the cost and increased the accessibility of investing in a wide variety of securities, including large-cap stocks, emerging market debt, precious metals, currencies and even agricultural commodities. However, more choice does not necessarily equate to higher returns. Therefore, investors should tread carefully.

Financial goals, diversification needs and risk tolerances should be the primary determinants when selecting an exchange-traded fund. Specifically, ask what asset classes and categories need to be included in your portfolio and then look for ETFs that match those requirements. Asset allocation ideas can be found in the Financial Planning section of AAII.com. Our Model ETF Portfolio also provides an idea of how to build and manage a diversified portfolio of exchange-traded funds (reviewed in the May and November AAII Journal issues and also available at AAII.com).

Once an asset class and category is determined, use this guide to find an appropriate exchange-traded fund. Most funds are named based on their underlying index (e.g., SPDR S&P 500 tracks the performance of the S&P 500 index). Understand that the construction of the underlying index will have a significant impact on the fund’s performance. For example, ExxonMobil Corp. (XOM) has a far larger weighting in the iShares S&P 500 Index Fund (IVV) than it does in the Rydex S&P Equal Weight ETF (RSP). The bigger the weighting, the greater the influence on an ETF’s performance. A new column in this year’s table called percent of portfolio in top 10 holdings shows how much weight is allotted to a fund’s largest positions.

All ETF sponsors list current holdings and the weighting of those holdings on their websites. This information not only provides additional insight into how dependent a fund is on its top two or three holdings, it can also help improve an investor’s portfolio diversification. Specifically, pay attention to whether a company accounts for a large position in two or more funds you are interested in.

Expenses matter and lower expenses are preferable. Expenses are influenced by the underlying securities; funds that use foreign securities, invest in commodities or use aggressive long or short strategies carry higher expenses. Some brokers waive commissions on select ETFs, but the savings on the commissions needs to be weighed against the annual expense ratio and the suitability of the ETF. A 20-basis point (0.2%) increase in annual expenses equates to $20 higher costs on a $10,000 investment. In other words, selecting an exchange-traded fund solely because commissions are waived may actually turn out to be a more expensive decision.

Again, be sure to look at a list of the fund’s current holdings and read through the prospectus before buying any exchange-traded fund. A listing of ETF sponsor website addresses is presented on page 11.

Which Funds Were Included

The funds listed in this issue have at least $200 million in total assets. This is double the size of the minimum requirement used in our 2009 guide and reflects the strong growth the industry has experienced. The rule was relaxed for funds held within the Model ETF Portfolio, which is why you will see First Trust Dow Jones Select MicroCap Index (FDM) listed.

 

In previous years, funds in existence for less than 12 months were excluded. This rule was not applied as it would have had only minimal impact on which funds were included in this year’s guide.

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A comprehensive listing of ETFs and ETNs with performance data and additional information is available on AAII.com. This expanded spreadsheet includes funds of all sizes and covers more than 1,000 funds.

Ultra and Contra ETFs

Several members have enquired about ETFs that move inversely to stock market indexes. In response, two of the new categories added this year are ultra market (long) and contra stock market. The ultra category includes funds that are designed to move in the same direction as their underlying index, but experience two to three times the price movement. The contra category contains funds that are designed to move in the opposite direction of the underlying index. Some of these funds may experience inverse price movement that is two to three times greater than the underlying index.


Funds that move with a greater magnitude than the index they track use leverage. For every dollar invested, an investor has the potential to earn double or triple the return he would otherwise earn. At the same time, the magnitude of potential losses is two to three times greater. In other words, these are very risky investments.
In addition to the considerably higher level of volatility, these funds have a much greater potential for tracking error. Tracking error is the extent to which a fund’s actual return differs from the index’s return. It can result in actual returns being significantly different from what an investor anticipated based on the performance of an index. ProShares, one of the providers of ultra and contra funds, clearly warns investors not to hold such funds for longer than one day. Specifically, ProShares states, “investment results over periods beyond a day can be significantly lower or higher than the daily objective due to compounding.”


This warning applies to both ultra and inverse funds. All these funds are suitable only for speculative trading on a single day; they should not be used for a longer-term holding.


Investors concerned about market risk will be better served by maintaining proper diversification across asset classes, maintaining a focus on long-term financial goals, and conducting a thorough analysis of all investments.

A Key to Terms and Statistics

Most of the information shown in the listing is provided by Morningstar Inc. or calculated from the data they have provided us. Any data source has the potential for error, however. Before investing in any exchange-traded fund or exchange-traded note, you should read the prospectus, annual reports and quarterly reports.
When a dash appears in an ETF listing, it indicates that the number was not available or does not apply in that particular instance. For example, the three-year annual return figure would not be available for funds that have been operating for less than three years. We did not compile the bull and bear ratings for ETFs not operating during the entire bull or bear market period. All numbers are truncated rather than rounded when necessary, unless noted otherwise in the following descriptions.

Return numbers that are in the top 25% of all funds within the investment category are shown in boldface. When the risk is in the lowest 25% for the category, this number is also bolded.

Figures given for the category averages are calculated based on the entire universe of ETFs.

The following provides an explanation of the terms we have used in the ETF listings. The explanations are listed in the order in which the data and information appear in the listing.

Enhanced: The letter “E” before an ETF’s name indicates that the fund is designed to outperform its underlying index by improved security selection or following a strategy that reduces comparative volatility.

Exchanged-Traded Note (ETN): The letter “N” before a fund’s name indicates that the investment is an exchange-traded note. As stated earlier, an ETN is a debt security designed to mimic the performance of an underlying index. The credit quality of the issuer needs to be considered when researching an ETN.

ETF Name: The exchange-traded funds are presented alphabetically by name within each category.

Ticker: The ticker symbol for each exchange-traded fund is given in parentheses for those investors who may want to access data with their computer or by using a touch-tone phone.

Total Return (%): Returns are based upon changes to a fund’s net asset value (NAV), assuming the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions (on the actual reinvestment date used by the fund) during the period. The return calculation is net of expenses. The year-to-date, 12-month, and three-year returns are calculated through August 31, 2010. The three-year return is presented on an annualized basis. Returns that are in the top 25% of all ETFs within the investment category are shown in boldface.

Bull Market Return: Reflects the ETF’s net asset value performance in the most recent bull market, starting March 1, 2009, and continuing through April 30, 2010. Returns in the top 25% of all ETFs within the investment category are shown in boldface.

Bear Market Return: Reflects the ETF’s net asset value performance in the most recent bear market, from November 1, 2007, through February 28, 2009. Returns in the top 25% of all ETFs within the investment category are shown in boldface.

Yield (%): The total annual income distributed by the ETF divided by the period-ending net asset value. Calculated on a per share basis, this ratio is similar to a dividend yield and would be higher for income-oriented funds and lower for growth-oriented funds. The figure only reflects income; it is not a total return.

Tax-Cost Ratio (%): Measures how much an ETF’s annualized return is reduced by the taxes paid on distributions, assuming the maximum marginal tax rate. A tax-cost ratio of 0.0% indicates that the fund did not make any taxable distributions. If a fund had a 3.0% tax-cost ratio, it means that on average each year, investors lost 3.0% of their assets to taxes. The lower the ratio, the more tax-efficient the ETF. The ratio is calculated using the last three years of data.

Risk Index—Category and Total: The category risk index is the standard deviation of an ETF’s return divided by the standard deviation of return for the average ETF in the category. The total risk index is the standard deviation of an ETF’s return divided by the average standard deviation of return for all ETFs. Standard deviation is a measure of return volatility and is computed using monthly returns for the last three years. A value of 1.00 denotes average risk. Values above 1.00 indicate greater risk than average while values below 1.00 indicate less risk than average. Risk numbers that are in the lowest 25% of all funds within the investment category are shown in boldface.

Total Assets ($ Mil): Presented as millions of dollars, this is the amount of total assets an ETF has under management. This is the total value of the fund’s portfolio. Size can be affected by the age of the fund, the index it follows and the number of competitive funds.

Average Daily Trading Volume (Thousands): Average daily volume of shares traded for the last three-month period through August 31, 2010.

Portfolio (%)--Stocks: The percentage of assets held in common stocks, both domestic and foreign. Preferred Stocks: The percentage of assets held in preferred stocks. Convertibles: The percentage of assets held in bonds or other debt securities that could be converted into common stock. Bonds: The percentage of assets held in debt securities that are not convertible into common stock. Other securities: The percentage of assets held in futures contracts, option contracts, trusts or other alternative securities. Cash & Equivalents: The percentage of assets held in cash or cash equivalents.

Percent of Portfolio in Foreign Issues: The percentage of the ETF’s assets that are invested in foreign stocks and bonds.

Portfolio Turnover Ratio (%): A measure of the trading activity of the ETF, which is computed by dividing the lesser of purchases or sales for the year by the monthly average value of the securities owned by the fund during the year. Securities with maturities of less than one year are excluded from the calculation. The result is expressed as a percentage, with 100% implying a complete turnover within one year.

Number of Holdings: The total number of individual securities held by the ETF. These can include stocks, bonds, currencies, futures contracts and option contracts. This figure is meant to be a measure of portfolio risk: The lower the number, the more concentrated the fund is in a few issues. Some ETFs may hold fewer shares than the index’s name would suggest. This occurs when the ETF’s manager believes he can mimic the returns of the index without holding all of the securities that comprise the index.

Percent of Portfolio in Top 10 Holdings: Investments, expressed as a percentage of the total portfolio assets, in the ETF’s top 10 portfolio holdings. The higher the percentage, the more concentrated the fund is in a few companies or issues, and the more the fund is susceptible to market fluctuations in those few holdings. Used in combination with the number of holdings, the percent of portfolio in the top 10 investments figure can indicate how concentrated an ETF is.

Expense Ratio (%): The sum of administrative fees and adviser management fees divided by the average net asset value of the ETF, stated as a percentage. Brokerage costs incurred by the fund are not included in the expense ratio.

Inception Date: The date when the ETF was formed and became available for sale to institutional investors. These “creation unit holders” then make the shares available for sale to individual investors.

 

Category Averages Performance Table 2010

ETF Category Ret YTD 2010 (%) Ret 2009 (%) Ret 2008 (%) Ret 2007 (%) Ret 12 Month (%) Ret 3 Year Ann'l (%) Bull Mkt Ret (%) Bear Mkt Ret (%) Yield (%) Tax Cost Ratio 3 Year (%) Total Risk Index (X) Std. Dev. (%) Avg Daily Trading Volume Avg Daily Dollar Trading Vol ($1,000) Total Assets ($ Mil) Stock (%) Preferred Stock (%) Convertible Issues (%) Bond (%) Other (%) Cash (%) % of Port in Foreign Issues (%) Portfolio Turnover Ratio (%) Number of Holdings % of Port in Top 10 Holdings (%) Expense Ratio (%)
 Large-Cap Stock -3.6 29.8 -36.5 4.7 6.9 -7.7 70.4 -50.7 1.7 0.7 1.09 22.5 3,032,674 290,250 1,782.0 99 0 0 1 0 0 3.1 36 434.0 28.8 0.42
 Mid-Cap Stock -1.0 39.5 -41.9 6.1 12.2 -7.9 101.6 -55.1 1.1 0.5 1.36 27.9 193,448 16,862 697.5 113 0 0 0 0 -13 2.9 80 334.0 32.8 0.49
 Small-Cap Stock -2.4 35.0 -35.0 -2.0 7.3 -7.0 103.0 -53.7 0.9 0.4 1.40 28.8 2,488,974 165,703 1,186.1 100 0 0 0 0 0 1.1 46 765.0 8.5 0.37
 Micro-Cap Stock -6.3 18.7 -38.5 -11.1 1.2 -14.4 84.5 -58.7 0.9 0.5 1.39 28.6 51,941 1,814 109.4 100 0 0 0 0 0 12.6 98 546.0 7.7 0.60
 Preferred Stock 13.1 33.1 -25.7 -16.0 24.9 1.3 119.4 -58.3 7.1 3.0 1.83 37.6 591,871 16,477 2,066.7 6 91 0 1 0 2 5.8 30 90.0 37.2 0.52
 Ultra Market (Long) -12.3 51.5 -66.6 12.8 1.5 -25.0 168.6 -81.5 0.5 0.6 2.37 48.7 3,696,912 148,685 305.3 225 0 0 3 1 -129 18.4 72 841.0 174.9 0.93
 Long-Short -4.8 31.4 -29.5 -- 5.2 -4.1 41.3 -36.7 1.9 0.0 0.84 17.3 21,309 569 57.0 100 0 0 0 0 0 1.6 42 281.0 47.9 0.80
 Contra Stock Market -4.7 -52.0 40.9 -7.6 -25.3 -15.1 -64.8 107.9 0.0 4.0 2.11 43.3 2,103,188 45,682 184.7 -186 0 0 -7 -12 306 -193.6 10 3.0 217.1 0.92
 Communications Sector -0.5 31.3 -40.4 4.5 15.3 -9.7 58.1 -51.5 2.9 0.9 1.20 24.7 91,879 2,351 152.5 110 0 0 0 0 -10 45.7 29 37.0 80.0 0.54
 Consumer Discretionary Sector 0.2 47.0 -38.2 -11.8 12.2 -7.0 107.8 -53.4 0.9 0.4 1.44 29.6 1,481,242 65,573 209.9 107 0 0 0 0 -7 25.0 40 124.5 42.2 0.5
 Consumer Staples Sector 2.9 23.6 -24.6 10.4 13.2 -0.3 57.0 -36.3 2.0 0.6 0.89 18.4 650,513 18,555 373.2 108 0 0 0 0 -8 31.0 38 74.0 59.1 0.50
 Energy Sector -13.5 42.8 -50.3 36.4 -0.4 -11.5 75.6 -57.3 1.3 0.4 1.74 35.8 778,616 42,050 392.0 107 0 0 0 0 -7 43.8 58 54.0 58.7 0.63
 Financial/Banking Sector -5.8 13.8 -46.9 -13.6 -5.6 -20.4 113.2 -67.7 1.5 0.8 1.71 35.1 4,207,799 80,615 362.8 111 0 0 0 0 -12 37.4 46 108.0 57.5 0.54
 Health Sector -4.4 25.5 -25.2 9.4 5.1 -2.6 54.7 -36.4 0.9 0.3 1.05 21.6 402,678 15,256 348.7 108 0 0 0 0 -8 21.0 39 70.0 60.9 0.53
 Homebuilders Sector -6.9 23.9 -38.9 -52.8 -11.7 -18.7 107.3 -60.2 0.8 0.5 2.13 43.9 3,312,526 51,215 447.6 100 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 42 26.0 50.3 0.41
 Industrial Sector -2.3 27.3 -38.6 15.1 9.1 -10.0 89.4 -55.3 1.4 0.5 1.43 29.4 811,094 27,549 253.0 104 0 0 0 0 -4 36.7 32 101.0 44.7 0.55
 Natural Resources Sector -5.9 60.4 -51.5 34.8 10.0 -7.1 106.0 -60.8 1.0 0.6 1.84 37.9 533,125 21,049 282.1 103 0 0 0 0 -3 60.2 39 72.0 53.6 0.60
 Precious Metals Sector 14.4 43.6 -26.5 16.9 33.4 13.3 61.7 -32.9 0.2 0.2 2.41 49.5 1,900,780 99,330 1,668.5 98 0 0 0 1 0 88.9 20 37.0 60.9 0.64
 Real Estate Sector 13.9 24.6 -43.6 -17.6 34.2 -11.6 133.7 -67.8 3.4 1.9 2.10 43.2 1,503,616 79,265 903.8 108 0 0 12 0 -20 25.5 33 70.0 77.1 0.51
 Real Estate Global Sector 1.5 41.9 -50.7 -6.9 10.8 -11.3 91.0 -66.6 5.5 1.7 1.57 32.3 34,607 1,131 181.4 98 0 0 0 2 0 77.0 17 142.0 40.4 0.53
 Technology Sector -10.1 76.7 -47.3 6.7 4.6 -8.5 110.1 -55.7 0.4 0.2 1.52 31.2 877,274 23,512 301.8 116 0 0 0 0 -16 29.7 41 73.0 77.7 0.57
 Utility Sector -5.7 15.5 -32.3 16.8 2.5 -6.5 36.8 -43.7 3.1 1.2 1.03 21.3 439,591 14,033 343.0 105 0 0 0 0 -5 40.6 34 51.0 55.7 0.53
 Miscellaneous Sector -1.8 40.3 -- -- 3.4 -- 72.7 -- 0.0 -- -- -- 3,439 86 5.8 0 0 0 0 9 91 0.0 22 4.0 100.0 0.70
 Commodities: Agriculture -1.7 13.1 -26.9 -- 7.1 0.1 8.5 -28.3 0.0 0.0 1.25 25.6 115,942 2,955 154.6 0 0 0 0 110 -10 0.0 0 18.0 99.5 0.79
 Commodities: Energy -20.2 11.2 -45.5 46.4 -12.5 -17.6 35.4 -56.9 0.0 0.0 1.99 40.9 2,190,579 31,487 416.4 0 0 0 3 102 -5 3.3 4 10.0 134.5 0.70
 Commodities: Precious Metals 13.1 42.6 -7.5 25.2 33.1 19.0 37.7 6.8 0.0 0.0 1.33 27.3 1,398,046 101,918 3,605.8 0 0 0 0 118 -18 0.0 0 4.0 86.1 0.60
 Commodities: Miscellaneous -6.7 52.7 -44.5 27.5 4.8 -8.7 66.7 -50.5 0.0 0.0 1.44 29.6 127,237 3,120 372.9 0 0 0 0 171 -71 0.0 0 22.0 81.4 0.77
 Balanced -0.4 19.5 -24.8 -- 6.0 -- 41.0 -30.3 2.3 -- -- -- 7,144.9 189.0 27.5 56 0 0 29 0 15 17.1 21 150.6 71.8 0.5
 Balanced: Global -0.5 21.0 -- -- 5.4 -- 48.3 -- 1.6 -- -- -- 12,461 373 39.9 42 1 0 27 5 24 26.2 67 14.0 98.7 0.79
 Global Stock -3.8 41.0 -44.4 8.5 5.1 -9.8 81.0 -58.4 2.6 1.4 1.32 27.1 45,303 1,951 226.4 92 0 0 0 0 7 55.6 42 472.0 39.8 0.59
 Foreign Stock -6.7 40.7 -44.2 11.7 1.1 -9.4 79.1 -57.3 2.6 1.2 1.32 27.3 644,629 32,446 1,223.3 103 0 0 0 1 -4 102.3 55 512.0 25.7 0.53
 Foreign Stock: Europe -9.9 45.7 -50.2 12.3 -2.5 -12.9 75.8 -62.2 2.7 1.4 1.56 32.0 372,908 10,820 379.9 103 0 0 0 0 -3 102.4 21 105.0 57.6 0.55
 Foreign Stock: Latin America 4.6 92.4 -46.4 45.8 33.9 3.3 115.6 -56.6 2.1 0.9 1.77 36.4 1,337,755 90,862 945.8 126 0 0 0 0 -26 125.1 22 43.0 93.4 0.73
 Foreign Stock: Pacific/Asia -2.1 53.2 -41.9 21.8 7.0 -4.4 87.1 -55.2 1.7 0.9 1.44 29.7 1,420,841 35,199 711.1 111 0 0 0 0 -12 111.0 21 136.0 62.2 0.67
 Foreign Stock: Emerging Markets 1.1 70.1 -49.1 40.6 16.1 0.5 117.6 -56.9 1.5 0.9 1.61 33.1 2,292,902 101,107 2,318.4 110 0 0 0 1 -11 110.1 42 181.0 55.8 0.68
 General Bond: Short-Term 3.2 5.0 2.6 -- 4.5 5.6 6.3 4.6 2.0 1.2 0.15 3.1 129,300 11,071 1,416.0 0 0 0 74 0 26 12.2 216 347.0 21.8 0.21
 General Bond: Intermediate-Term 8.2 7.7 3.7 6.5 10.1 7.9 12.9 4.3 3.7 1.6 0.26 5.4 146,669 13,647 2,000.5 0 0 0 92 0 8 12.5 317 1,255.0 30.4 0.20
 General Bond: Long-Term 14.3 6.9 4.1 3.7 15.2 9.6 18.5 -1.0 4.9 1.9 0.56 11.5 228,296 24,918 2,986.2 0 0 0 99 0 1 20.1 48 418.0 15.6 0.15
 General Bond: Other -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 288 15 2.6 0 0 0 100 0 0 2.9 -- 72.0 44.4 0.35
 Convertible Bond 1.7 -- -- -- 13.2 -- -- -- 5.0 -- -- -- 90,870 3,527 307.7 2 20 73 4 0 1 0.8 26 118.0 23.4 0.40
 Corporate Bond: High-Yield 6.0 41.3 -29.1 -- 17.1 5.0 44.6 -24.1 8.5 3.2 0.82 17.0 868,347 45,344 3,016.4 0 0 0 99 0 1 7.8 52 166.0 19.8 0.44
 Inflation-Protected Bond 6.4 11.2 -2.4 11.4 8.8 7.0 14.7 0.9 2.6 1.4 0.43 8.9 137,643 13,613 3,603.4 0 0 0 99 0 1 0.0 39 21.0 74.7 0.19
 Gov't Bond: Short-Term 1.4 0.4 3.7 7.3 1.4 2.2 1.1 4.7 0.8 0.6 0.04 1.0 264,368 19,951 1,566.8 0 0 0 91 0 9 0.0 284 35.0 71.1 0.31
 Gov't Bond: Intermediate-Term 7.6 -0.6 12.2 -- 6.8 7.5 2.8 13.6 2.0 1.0 0.22 4.6 54,346 5,846 413.5 0 0 0 97 0 3 0.0 88 71.0 49.6 0.15
 Gov't Bond: Long-Term 29.2 -16.1 28.8 10.1 21.3 10.9 -2.4 17.0 2.9 1.4 0.62 12.8 538,461 54,743 519.8 0 0 0 149 0 -49 0.0 115 21.0 133.6 0.48
 Gov't Bond: Other 10.7 4.1 6.3 -- 8.4 7.3 8.6 6.7 3.0 1.3 0.23 4.7 7,620 706 176.7 0 0 0 97 0 4 10.7 46 257.0 41.5 0.34
 Contra Bond Market -17.4 3.2 -4.4 -- -15.7 -0.2 -8.7 -10.5 0.0 0.0 0.52 10.9 834,746 25,766 404.2 0 0 0 -146 0 246 -146.1 0 3.0 179.5 0.89
 Municipal National Bond: Short-Term 1.8 4.3 4.2 -- 3.4 -- 3.5 8.4 1.4 -- -- -- 73,800 2,069 290.8 0 0 0 97 0 3 0.0 28 155.0 24.7 0.26
 Municipal National Bond: Intermediate-Term 6.0 10.7 -0.6 -- 7.4 -- 6.1 -- 2.3 -- -- -- 16,215 463 48.3 0 0 0 100 0 0 0.0 17 107.0 26.5 0.30
 Municipal National Bond: Long-Term 9.0 14.3 -4.3 -- 10.4 -- 12.5 0.4 4.0 -- -- -- 138,647 5,229 740.8 0 0 0 98 0 2 0.0 16 332.0 16.3 0.27
 Municipal Bond: State Specific 7.5 13.2 -5.3 -- 10.2 -- 11.2 -0.2 4.0 -- -- -- 7,005 303 84.3 0 0 0 99 0 1 0.0 14 98.0 28.7 0.24
 International Bond: General -0.8 12.5 4.4 -- 0.2 -- 14.9 -3.6 1.3 -- -- -- 37,191 2,166 343.7 0 0 0 96 1 3 94.2 64 75.0 39.7 0.44
 International Bond: Emerging 13.2 30.1 -13.2 -- 19.4 -- 37.8 -14.7 5.5 -- -- -- 227,126 11,921 785.2 0 0 0 99 0 1 97.4 28 60.0 35.1 0.54
 Currency -1.2 8.9 -6.8 11.5 1.0 0.9 15.6 -11.8 0.3 0.4 0.66 13.7 195,831 12,735 170.4 0 0 0 0 0 100 0.0 0 9.0 0.0 0.54

 

 

Copyright 2010 American Association of Individual Investors and Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
The information contained herein: (1) is proprietary to Morningstar and/or its content providers; (2) may not be copied or distributed; and (3) is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. Neither Morningstar nor its content providers are responsible for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information.
Past performance is nor guarantee of future results.

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http://www.aaii.com/journal/article/websites-for-exchange-traded-funds

Exchange-Traded Fund Categories
 

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are growing in number and track a variety of indexes. Many ETFs, however, have shared investments that generally lead to other characteristics that are similar.

These shared characteristics allow us to divide exchange-traded funds into categories; here we define the ETF categories used in AAII's Guide to Exchange-Traded Funds. In the guide, the individual fund listings appear alphabetically within each category.

Stock ETFs

ETFs that invest in common stocks typically follow indexes based on market capitalization, country, style, sector, industry or a combination of these characteristics. The underlying index may either be well known, such as the S&P 500, or one that has been created for the fund to follow. Over the stock market cycles, large stocks behave differently from small stocks, domestic stocks do not move in unison with foreign or emerging market stocks, and stocks in different sectors or industries react differently to the same economic and business conditions.

For investors to make initial investment decisions on stock-based ETFs and to compare and evaluate the ongoing performance of investments in stock-based ETFs, grouping similar funds together into cohesive categories is a logical first step.

Large-Cap Stock

In funds categorized by stock size, the "cap" stands for capitalization (market share price times number of shares of common stock outstanding).

Large-cap stocks are usually stocks of national or multinational firms with well-known products or services provided to consumers, other businesses, or governments. Most of the stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average, the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ 100 are, for example, large-cap stocks. While some large-cap stocks are more volatile than others, a well-diversified ETF portfolio of large-cap stocks would perform similarly to most investors'conception of the stock market. Large-cap stocks, as a category, also tend to pay the highest cash dividends, although many large-cap stocks pay no dividends. Large-cap stock funds, in summary, tend to have the lowest volatility and highest dividend yield in the domestic common stock group.

Mid-Cap Stock

Mid-cap stocks are, as their name implies, smaller than the largest domestic stocks. They are usually established firms in established industries with regional, national and sometimes international markets for their products and services. The S&P MidCap 400 index is the best-known benchmark for mid-cap stocks. These ETFs would tend to have lower dividend yields than large-cap funds and to have somewhat higher volatility.

Small-Cap Stock

Small-cap stocks are often emerging firms in sometimes emerging industries. But also, these small companies can be established firms with local, regional and sometimes even national and international markets. The most well-known benchmark for this group is the S&P SmallCap 600 index. These stocks must have liquid enough trading for ETFs to invest and, although small, are still listed on the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange or NASDAQ. Small-cap ETFs tend to be more volatile than large-cap and mid-cap ETFs, have very low dividend yields, and often do not move in tandem with large-cap and mid-cap funds.

Micro-Cap Stock

Micro-cap stocks are also often emerging firms in sometimes emerging industries, but have comparatively lower market capitalizations (total shares outstanding times price). These stocks can be traded less frequently, though the ones selected for inclusion within an index must have enough volume for ETFs to invest in. These micro-cap funds tend to be more volatile than large-cap and mid-cap ETFs, have very low dividend yields, and often do not move in tandem with large-cap and mid-cap funds.

Preferred Stock

Preferred stocks are a hybrid security. Preferred shareholders receive quarterly dividends, but lack most of the voting rights that common stock shareholders have. Dividends on the preferred stock must be paid before dividends on common stock are. If a dividend payment on preferred stock is missed, the dividend payments accrue indefinitely until paid. In the event of bankruptcy, the interests of preferred stock shareholders come before common stock shareholders, but after the interests of bondholders. Prices of preferred shares are influenced both by interest rate fluctuations and the profitability of the issuer. Therefore, they do not necessarily move in tandem with either bonds or common stock.

Ultra Market

Ultra market ETFs seek to produce a return that is two-to-three times higher than the underlying index for a specific day. For example, if the underlying index rises 1%, an ultra market ETF may rise 2%. These are very aggressive funds and are designed to be used solely on a single day. Holding such funds for longer periods can result in returns that may be worse than expected.

Contra Stock Market

Contra market ETFs seek to produce a return that is the inverse of how the underlying index performed for a given day. For example, if the underlying index falls 1%, a contra stock market ETF may rise 1%. A fund labeled “double,” “2x” or “3x” is intended to produce a return that is two-to-three times inverse of the underlying index. (If the index falls 1%, these ETFs may rise by 2% or 3%.) These are very aggressive funds and are designed to be used solely on a single day. Holding such funds for longer periods can result in returns that may be worse than expected.

Long-Short

These ETFs follow one of two strategies. The first is to use both long and short exposures in an attempt to profit from the market’s volatility. The second is to use options, such as covered calls, to produce a stream of income that is not tied to the market’s fortunes.

Long-short funds hold sizable stakes in both long and short positions. Some funds are market neutral, dividing their exposure equally between long and short positions in an attempt to earn a modest return that is not tied to the market's fortunes. Others shift exposure to long and short positions depending upon their macro outlook or the opportunities they uncover through bottom-up research.

Contra stock market funds invest in short stock positions and derivatives. Because these funds often have extensive holdings in shorts or puts, returns generally move in the opposite direction of the benchmark index.

Sector Stock

Sector ETFs concentrate their stock holdings in just one industry or a few related industries. They are diversified within the sector, but are not broadly diversified. They may invest in the U.S.or internationally. They are still influenced and react to industry/sector factors as well as general stock market factors. Sector funds have greater risk than diversified common stock funds. As is clear from this sector category list, some sectors are of greater risk than others--technology versus utilities, for example. By definition, a sector fund is a concentrated, not diversified, fund holding.

Commodities ETFs

Commodities ETFs and ETNs track the price movement of physical commodities, including metals, oil, natural gas, and grains. These funds may either invest in the physical commodity (typically via a trust that actually holds the commodity) or through the use of futures contracts. ETNs are debt securities and the credit rating of the issuing firm must be taken into consideration. Commodities move independently of stocks as their prices can be impacted by global politics, weather patterns and labor rest, as well as the state of the economy. Commodities can appreciate when inflation is strong and depreciate during deflationary periods. Commodity investments should account for no more than a small percentage of one’s portfolio.

Balanced ETFs

In general, the portfolios of balanced ETFs consist of investments in common stocks and significant investments in bonds and convertible securities. The range as a percentage of the total portfolio of stocks and bonds is usually stated in the investment objective, and the portfolio manager has the option of allocating the proportions within the range. Some asset allocation funds--funds that have a wide latitude of portfolio composition change--can also be found in the balanced category.

Many ETFs included in this category are target date funds. A target date fund differs from a pure balance fund in that its portfolio allocation adjusts as the target date draws near. Specifically, the target date fund’s portfolio reduces its risk (more of the portfolio is shifted out of stocks and into bonds) as the target date approaches.

Global balanced ETFs invest internationally.

A balanced ETF is generally less volatile than a stock ETF and provides a higher yield.  

Global Stock and Foreign Stock ETFs

Global stock and foreign stock ETFs invest in the stocks of foreign firms. Some stock funds specialize in a single country, others in regions, such as the Pacific or Europe, and others invest in multiple foreign regions. In addition, some stock funds--usually termed "global funds"--invest in both foreign and U.S.securities.

International funds provide investors with added diversification. The most important factor when diversifying a portfolio is selecting investments whose returns are not highly correlated. Within the U.S., investors can diversify by selecting securities of firms in different industries. In the international realm, investors take the diversification process one step further by holding securities of firms in different countries. The more independently these foreign markets move in relation to the U.S.stock market, the greater the diversification benefit will be, and the lower the risk of the total portfolio.

In addition, international ETFs overcome some of the difficulties investors face in making foreign investments directly. For instance, individuals must thoroughly understand the foreign brokerage process, be familiar with the various foreign marketplaces and their economies, be aware of currency fluctuation trends, and have access to reliable financial information in order to invest directly in foreign stocks. This can be a monumental task for the individual investor.

There are some risks unique to investing internationally. In addition to the risk inherent in investing in any security, there is an additional exchange rate risk. The return to a U.S.investor from a foreign security depends on both the security's return in its own currency and the rate at which that currency can be exchanged for U.S. dollars. Another uncertainty is political risk, which includes government restriction, taxation, or even total prohibition of the exchange of one currency into another. Of course, the more the exchange-traded fund is diversified among various countries, the less the risk involved.

Bond ETFs

Bond ETFs are attractive to investors because they provide diversification and liquidity, which is not as readily attainable in direct bond investments.

Bond funds have portfolios with a wide range of average maturities. Many funds use their names to characterize their maturity structure. Generally, short term means that the portfolio has a weighted average maturity of less than three years. Intermediate implies an average maturity of three to 10 years, and long term is over 10 years. The longer the maturity, the greater the change in fund value when interest rates change. Longer-term bond funds are riskier than shorter-term funds, and they usually offer higher yields.

Taxable Bond Funds

Bond ETFs are principally categorized by the types of bonds they hold.

Government bond funds invest in the bonds of the U.S.government and its agencies, while mortgage funds invest primarily in mortgage-backed bonds. General bond funds invest in a mix of government and agency bonds, corporate bonds (investment grade), and mortgage-backed bonds. Government and general bond funds are further categorized by maturity: short-term, intermediate-term and long-term.

A special category of inflation-protected bond ETFs hold Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS).

Corporate high-yield bond ETFs provide high income but invest generally in corporate bonds rated below investment grade, making them riskier.

Convertible bond ETFs invest primarily in preferred stocks and bonds that are convertible into common stocks. These securities exhibit characteristics of both stocks and bonds by offering yield and the possibility of capital appreciation.

Municipal and State-Specific Bond Funds

Tax-exempt municipal bond ETFs invest in bonds whose income is exempt from federal income tax. Some tax-exempt funds may invest in municipal bonds whose income is also exempt from the income tax of a specific state.

International Bond Funds

International bond ETFs allow investors to hold a diversified portfolio of foreign corporate and government bonds. These foreign bonds often offer higher yields, but carry additional risks beyond those of domestic bonds. As with foreign common stocks, currency risk can be as significant as the potential default of foreign government bonds--a particular risk with the debt of emerging countries. International bond funds are categorized as general or emerging.

Contra Bond

Contra bond ETFs seek to produce a return that is the inverse of how the underlying bond index performed for a given day. For example, if the underlying index falls 1%, a contra bond ETF may rise 1%. A fund labeled “ultrashort,” “2x” or “3x” is intended to produce a return that is 200% or 300% inverse of the underlying index. (If the index falls 1%, these ETFs may rise by 2% or 3%.) These are very aggressive funds and are designed to be used solely on a single day. Holding such funds for longer periods can result in returns that may be worse than expected.

Currency ETFs

Currency ETFs are designed to track changes in exchange rates between two or more currencies. Most currency funds seek a total return reflective of changes between the U.S. dollar and a foreign currency. Some currency ETFs, however track the changes in exchange rates among several currencies. Exchange rates move independently of stock prices, but can be volatile, are difficult to forecast and may not be suitable for all investors.

ETF & ETN Contact Information

Fund Family Name Web Address
AdvisorShares www.advisorshares.com
ALPS www.alpsinc.com
Barclays Bank PLC www.barclaysinvestments.co.uk
Claymore Securities www.claymore.com
Credit Suisse www.credit-suisse.com/fr/fr/
DBX Strategic Advisors LLC www.xsharesadvisors.com
Deutsche Bank AG www.db.com/india
Direxion Funds www.direxionshares.com
Emerging Global Advisors www.egshares.com
ETF Securities Ltd. (ETFS) www.etfsecurities.com
FaithShares www.faithshares.com
Fidelity Investments www.fidelity.com
First Trust www.ftportfolios.com
Geary Advisors www.txfetf.com
Global X Funds www.globalxfunds.com
Goldman Sachs www2.goldmansachs.com
Grail Advisors www.grailadvisors.com
GreenHaven www.greenhavenfunds.com
HSBC www.us.hsbc.com
IndexIQ www.indexiq.com
iPath www.ipathetn.com
iShares www.ishares.com
JETS www.javelinfunds.com
JPMorgan www.jpmorgan.com
Merrill Lynch (HOLDRS) www.holdrs.com
Morgan Stanley (MSCI) www.morganstanley.com
Old Mutual www.foreside.com
Pax World www.paxworld.com
PIMCO www.pimcoetfs.com
PowerShares www.invescopowershares.com
PowerShares DB www.dbfunds.db.com
ProShares www.proshares.com
Rydex|SGI www.rydex-sgi.com/
Rydex|SGI (CurrencyShares ETFs) www.currencyshares.com
Schwab Funds www.schwab.com/schwabfunds
State Street Global Advisors (SPDRs) www.spdrs.com
Swedish Export Credit Corp. (ELEMENTS ETNs) www.elementsetn.com
Teucrium www.teucriumcornfund.com
U.S. One Trust www.onefund.com
UBS fundgate.ubs.com
United States Commodity Funds LLC www.unitedstatescommodityfunds.com
Van Eck (Market Vectors ETFs) www.vaneck.com
Vanguard www.vanguard.com
VTL Associates, LLC (RevenueShares) www.revenuesharesetfs.com
WisdomTree www.wisdomtree.com


Discussion

William from AL posted over 3 years ago:

I am looking for a fund that covers REES
What do you have?


David from FL posted over 3 years ago:

Timing is everything!

Been poring over various resources to design an all ETF portfolio. The downloadable 2010 listing of ETF's in the October issue is invaluable since it now allows Excel features to be applied to the table for sorting according to my preferences. It certainly makes the screening easier before building the portfolio in a site like Fidelity, Morningstar or SmartMoney.

This issue more than justifies the modest annual fee for membership in AAII


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