Close

Stocks for the Long Term: Why Prospects Are Rosy

by Dale Domian and William Reichenstein

Stocks For The Long Term: Why Prospects Are Rosy Splash image

You already know the bad news: U.S. stocks as measured by the S&P 500 lost almost 50% from the October 2007 peak though November 18, 2008. Most foreign stock indexes were off by a little more than 50% this year.

The good news is that based on today’s depressed prices, long-term stock prospects appear above average.

In this article, we take a look at some of the evidence that supports a rosy multi-year stock outlook, and provide a framework for applying these forecasts.

...To continue reading this article you must be registered with AAII.

Gain exclusive access to this article and all of the member benefits and investment education AAII offers.
JOIN TODAY for just $29.
Log in
Already registered with AAII? Login to read the rest of this article.

Register for FREE
to read this article and receive access to future AAII.com articles.
  
Dale Domian , Ph.D., CFA, CFP, is professor of finance at York University in Toronto, Canada. He can be contacted at ddomian@yorku.ca.
William Reichenstein , CFA, holds the Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair in Investment Management at Baylor University and is head of research at Social Security Solutions, Inc .


Discussion

Donald from Maryland posted over 2 years ago:

Will AAII be publishing the three indicators discussed in this article?


Joesph from Pennsylvania posted over 2 years ago:

I am a relatively new member to aaii. Still exploring and learning from the writings and all that the web site has to offer.

Same question as above. Will aaii be publishing the 3 indicators discussed in the article each quarter? Or, will aaii direct readers as to how we can review a summary of the selected tables/charts with the data offered?


Charles Rotblut from Illinois posted over 2 years ago:

These indicators are not included the datafeeds we receive. Robert Shiller maintains a website with his information at http://www.econ.yale.edu/~shiller/data.htm

The bond yields are available at many financial websites, such as Bloomberg.

I would check Value Line's website for its indicator.


You need to log in as a registered AAII user before commenting.
Create an account

Log In